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White Light: Glass Compositions by Daniel Clayman

Mint Museum UPTOWN Dec 15 2007-May 25 2008   /  During the new millennium, when "art glass" has become a familiar household term characterized by color, glitz and monumentality, Clayman exercises the most severe form of restraint, creating Minimalist forms which explore form, movement and light.

Exhibition Highlights

About The Exhibition

Daniel Clayman trained as a studio glass artist in private studios and schools across America throughout the 1970s. Since he received his BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1986, he has pursued the art of cire perdue or "lost wax" casting, creating unique sculptures in glass and bronze. From the opaque to the translucent, these materials alternately serve as sheathes and the sheathed, containers and the contained. From the mid-1980s onward he developed a series of organic pod forms, which explored the themes of protective nests and enclosure. His exploration evolved into studies of form and movement, channeled forms in particular. Here we see the seeds of his mature style, defined by its increasing refinement of form.

During the new millennium, when "art glass" has become a familiar household term characterized by color, glitz and monumentality, Clayman exercises the most severe form of restraint, creating Minimalist forms which explore "the subtlety and the drama of form and movement," light and shadow. In White Light, Clayman debuts an entirely new body of work. Paring down forms to their absolute essence, Clayman has created an aesthetic defined by spare elegance. In so doing, Clayman defies our multitask-oriented environment and redefines it as one of solace and grace.

Sponsored by The Founders' Circle Ltd., the national support affiliate of the Mint Museum of Craft + Design. Additional funding provided by a grant from the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass